Pangolin species

Pipisin Pangolin is a Philippine pangolin, inspired by my visit to the Philippines. But did you know… there are eight different species of pangolin? Four in Africa and four in Asia. Pipisin has been on his travels, and finally, met all the species.

African species

Enjoying a mud bath with Temminck's pangolin
Enjoying a mud bath with Temminck’s pangolin
Eating ants with giant ground pangolin
Eating ants with giant ground pangolin
Watching rainbows with black bellied pangolin
Watching rainbows with black-bellied pangolin
Playing hide and seek with white-bellied pangolins
Playing hide and seek with white-bellied pangolins

Asian species

Looking for a Chinese pangolin
Looking for a Chinese pangolin
Reading with an Indian pangolin
Reading with an Indian pangolin
Swimming with a Sunda pangolin
Swimming with a Sunda pangolin
Pipisin, a Philippine pangolin, in the forest of Palawan
Pipisin, a Philippine pangolin, in the forest of Palawan

Pangolin rescue mini-picture book

With one cut and a few simple folds, create a mini-picture book that tells the story of a pangolin rescued and cared for until it could be released back into the wild.

Originally created for the Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary in Liberia to help explain the work they do to children. Unfortunately, not every child in Liberia goes to school. Not only do they miss out on general education, they never learn about animals or nature conservation.

Click on this image to open the pdf that can be downloaded and printed:
(nb. select ‘actual size’ when printing to help when making the folds)

Libassa mini-story

Follow the steps below to make your mini-picture book:

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Follow the work of Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary on instagram and make a donation to support their vital work.

Click here for more pangolin crafts!

 

 

 

#200Fish

Worm pipefish in a rockpool (collage of painted papers and card) ~ my contribution to the #200Fish project with artists illustrating 200 species of fish from the North Sea.

Collage of worm pipefish in a rock pool
Hiding amongst the seaweed in the rockpools of the North Sea coast, could be this relative of the seahorse.  The worm pipefish (Nerophis lumbriciformis) has a similar upturned snout to a seahorse and exhibits similar behaviour with the parental duties being undertaken by the male.

Females are larger, more colourful and more active than males. After courtship and mating, the female transfers about 150 eggs into a shallow groove on the male’s belly. The male protects the eggs until they hatch as free-swimming baby pipefish and drift away in the current. Here, the males parental responsibilities end.

As breeding is correlated with seawater temperatures below 15.5°C, these fish are likely to be susceptible to changes in ocean temperatures. Extreme site fidelity and homing behaviour has also been documented in worm pipefish so they are perhaps unlikely to respond well to change.

Worm pipefish grow to about 15cm long (illustrated lifesize, artwork size: 21.5cm x 31.5cm).

 

Information from:

The IUCN Red List

MarLIN – The Marine Life Information Network

 

 

#200Fish is a project of Transition Town Louth